Conférence en ligne : Christian Kleinbub, Art and Internal Anatomy – Michelangelo, Bronzino, and Mannerist Bodies, 8 février 2022, 5:00-6:30 pm (CET)

Christian Kleinbub – Ohio State University
Building on the speaker’s research on Michelangelo’s investment in internal anatomical matters, this talk proposes that other artists of his time, especially Bronzino, paid particular attention to the meaning of the internal organs like the liver, heart, and brain, referencing those organs to explain the internal states of represented bodies. Although such references were only occasionally systematic, this talk contends that they contributed to something like an elite visual language of the body that depended on a long tradition in Tuscan poetry with special reference to Dante. Anatomy is featured throughout the practice and theorization of Italian art in the sixteenth century. Yet, almost without exception, the textual and pictorial evidence has been taken to suggest that artists were concerned only with superficial anatomy, those parts of the body visible on its outsides such as muscles, bones, and sinews. These findings emphasize that the Mannerist body cannot be easily dismissed as a matter only of arbitrary or ornamental form, and they cause us to rethink what “artificiality” means in discussing the art of the period.

The event is free to attend but registration is required. To register click here.

Source 



Citer ce billet
Fiammetta Campagnoli (2022, 6 février). Conférence en ligne : Christian Kleinbub, Art and Internal Anatomy – Michelangelo, Bronzino, and Mannerist Bodies, 8 février 2022, 5:00-6:30 pm (CET). Collectif d'Historiens de l'Art de la Renaissance. Consulté le 24 juin 2024, à l’adresse https://doi.org/10.58079/mos3

Fiammetta Campagnoli

Fiammetta Campagnoli est doctorante en histoire de l'art moderne à l'Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne. Ses recherches se concentrent sur la perception et sur la réception de la spatialité de l’image mariale au XVe et au XVIe siècle.

Vous aimerez aussi...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search