Conférence : Martin Clayton, «’Describe the jaw of a crocodile’: Leonardo da Vinci’s Animal Anatomies », Londres, Courtauld Institute of Art, 9 mai 2024, 17h30

Leonardo’s anatomical work was the most accomplished of his many scientific studies. Like all his research, it combined traditional beliefs with acute direct observation, including the dissection of up to thirty human cadavers. But Leonardo also studied and dissected animals at many points of his career. His subjects included horses, bears, monkeys, frogs, dogs and oxen – as surrogates for human material, as independent subjects of study, and on occasion to compare explicitly human and animal anatomy. Though it is challenging to identify any overarching methodology in these studies, and even harder to detect any lasting ‘influence’, this is typical of Leonardo’s scientific studies. The drawings and notes on animal anatomy can therefore be seen as a case study of his aims in anatomy and his scientific methods overall.  

Source


OpenEdition vous propose de citer ce billet de la manière suivante :
morganetagachoucht (29 avril 2024). Conférence : Martin Clayton, «’Describe the jaw of a crocodile’: Leonardo da Vinci’s Animal Anatomies », Londres, Courtauld Institute of Art, 9 mai 2024, 17h30. Collectif d'Historiens de l'Art de la Renaissance. Consulté le 19 juillet 2024 à l’adresse https://doi.org/10.58079/xt46


Vous aimerez aussi...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search