Étiqueté : animal

Appel à contribution : « Animal, animalité, bestialité dans les images médiévales », Paris, INHA, 13 juin 2024, date limite le 8 mars 2024

Le GRIM – Groupe de Recherches en iconographie médiévale – est un collectif académique fondé par Christian Heck s’intéressant à l’analyse et l’interprétation des œuvres du Moyen Âge, mais aussi aux corpus et bases d’images qui les rendent possibles. Il est dorénavant lié à IMAGO, association d’historiens de l’art sise au CESCM de Poitiers, et porté par un comité scientifique (Charlotte Denoël, Conservatrice en chef, BnF, département des manuscrits/Centre Jean Mabillon ; Anne-Orange Poilpré, PR, Université...

Parution : Alexander Nagel (dir.), I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance, The Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, 2023

Volume 26, Number 1, Spring 2023 Editor’s Note Alexander Nagel pp. 1–2 The Whisperers: Invidious Perspectives in Trecento Painting Christopher S. Wood pp. 3–33 Caravaggio, Alberti, and Narcissan Disegno Estelle Lingo pp. 35–62 On the Gaze and “gl’idoli altrui”: Vision and Loss in Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata Alani Hicks-Bartlett pp. 63–90 Islands in Flux: Migration and Ecological Change in Early Modern Isolari (Books of Islands) James K. Coleman pp. 91–108 Cellini’s Dog Sefy Hendler pp. 109–144...

Appel à contribution : « Mapping Global Animal (in) Spaces », Florence, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz – Max-Planck-Institut, 25-26 janvier 2024, date limite le 15 juillet 2023

Human-animal interactions occur in specific spatial settings. Animals are often perceived as ‘victims’ of human dominance; they are and have been affected spatially by various human interventions including migration, agricultural exploitation, war, trade, geographical exploration, scientific expeditions, imperialism, and colonialism. But, our ‘silent (or not so silent) neighbors’ do not merely surround us; they too are migrants as well as active producers of space and built environments. Much as human beings migrate, create, and shape...

Appel à contribution : « Émotions animales : un malentendu ? XIIe-XVIIIe s. », Nantes, Nantes Université, 7-8 septembre 2023, date limite le 15 mai 2023

Colloque international interdisciplinaire (Lettres, Histoire, Histoire de l’art, Philosophie) Organisation : Louise Millon-Hazo (Nantes Université LAMO) ; Pierre-Olivier Dittmar (EHESS CRH-GAHOM) ; Justine Le Floc’h (Université de Kyoto) « Un lion pourrait parler, nous ne pourrions le comprendre », c’est d’après cette citation de Ludwig Wittgenstein qu’a été intitulé l’imposant volume dirigé par Boris Cyrulnik, rassemblant divers essais sur la condition animale. L’ouvrage collectif Si les lions pouvaient parler, publié en 1998, s’ouvre sur une réflexion du neuropsychiatre aboutissant au constat...

Parution : Sarah Cohen, “Picturing Animals in Early Modern Europe: Art and Soul”, Turnhout, Brepols, 2022

Do animals other than humans have consciousness? Do they knowingly feel and think, rather than simply respond to stimuli? Can they be said to have their own subjectivity? These questions, which are still debated today, arose forcefully in Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when empirical approaches to defining and studying the natural world were coming to the fore. Philosophers, physicians and moralists debated the question of whether the immaterial “soul”–which in the early...

Exposition : « Clara the Rhinoceros », Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, 30 septembre 2022-15 janvier 2023

The exhibition shows how new knowledge changed perceptions of the rhinoceros, and how art played its part in this process. The 60 objects on display include paintings, drawings, medals, statues, books, clocks and a goblet. Very few of these artworks have been displayed before in the Netherlands, and never before have so many exceptional objects devoted to Clara the rhinoceros being presented together. They range from the first-ever European print depicting a rhinoceros – made...

Journée d’étude : « L’animal à l’épreuve de l’histoire de l’art », Grenoble et en ligne, Université Grenoble Alpes, 21 octobre 2022

Les Études Animales, apparues dans les années 1970, se sont peu à peu imposées dans les sciences humaines, faisant de la question animale un sujet émergent. Cette remise en cause de l’anthropocentrisme, amorcée sur fond de catastrophe écologique, a eu plus de mal à atteindre l’histoire de l’art qui semble encore réticente à embrasser ce champ de recherche pourtant incontournable. Bien que la question de l’animalité dans l’art contemporain soit de plus en plus souvent...

Appel à contributions : Medieval and Early Modern Equids: Classifying by Breeds, Types and Functions, date limite le 10 septembre 2022

Medieval and Early Modern Equids: Classifying by Breeds, Types and Functions Call for papers for a special thematic volume to be published in the Rewriting Equestrian History series by Trivent Medieval Nature has not given [all horses] the same capabilities. Some shine more at war work; others are inclined to win Olympic crowns; others are adaptable for domestic use, civilian duties and farm work. Leon Battista Alberti, De equo animante (c. 1445) Equine breeds as we think of them...

Exposition : “Rhinoceros – a fabulous animal works on paper from three centuries”, Nuremberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, du 21 juillet 2022 au 26 juillet 2023

The studio exhibition presents images of the rhinoceros on paper from three centuries. This period saw the transformation from a creature of the imagination to a realistically-depicted animal. In 1500, almost no-one in Europe had ever actually seen a rhinoceros, and the legendary creature was associated with myth and many stories. It was considered wild, dangerous and the elephant’s natural enemy, but also exotically fascinating, testimony to an unknown world. Two images, in particular, were...

Exposition : “Hans Hoffmann. A European artist of the Renaissance”, Nuremberg, German National Museum, du 12 mai au 8 août 2022

  Nuremberg citizen and European artist: Hans Hoffmann (ca. 1545/50 – 1591/92) is considered one of the leading lights of the “Duerer Renaissance”. His artistic reputation is based on his numerous copies of works by the old master. Imitation was not a practice he alone specialised in, however; rather, it was part of a European art phenomenon which reached its peak in around 1600. In comparing the work of Hoffmann with that of Duerer and...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search