Étiqueté : Art et religion

Parution : C. Carman, « Leon Battista Alberti and Nicholas Cusanus. Towards an Epistemology of Vision for Italian Renaissance Art and Culture », Routledge, 2021

Providing a fresh evaluation of Alberti’s text On Painting (1435), along with comparisons to various works of Nicholas Cusanus – particularly his Vision of God (1450) – this study reveals a shared epistemology of vision. And, the author argues, it is one that reflects a more deeply Christian Neoplatonic ideal than is typically accorded Alberti. Whether regarding his purpose in teaching the use of a geometric single point perspective system, or more broadly in rendering...

Appel à contribution : « Reviving the Trinity. New Perspectives on 15th-Century Scottish Culture », en ligne, 27 mars 2021, date limite le 1er février 2021

This collaborative, interdisciplinary project looks again at the Trinity Altarpiece by Hugo van der Goes, Trinity Collegiate Church, and Trinity Hospital as emblems of Scotland’s inventive and ambitious cultural milieu, and its active, outward looking engagement with Europe and beyond. The network will re-examine the Trinity, and establish its cultural relevance today. Taking innovative approaches to materialities, geographies, and the wider artistic, intellectual, and cultural networks that connect them during the reigns of James II,...

Appel à communication : « The Virgin as Auctoritas : The Authority of the Virgin Mary and female moral–doctrinal authority in the Middle Ages », Association for Art History Annual Conference, Birmingham, date limite le 19 octobre 2020

Annual Association for Art History Conference, Birmingham 14 – 17 April 2021 Deadline 19 October 2020 This session aims at exploring a fundamental issue: female authority through the lens of visual/material culture. It involves prominently the Virgin Mary – as well as figures of female authority in the medieval world – because in the late decades of the 20th century, feminist thinkers pointed at the ‘negative model’ offered by the Virgin Mary since for centuries...

Parution : L. Bosch, « Mannerism, Spirituality and Cognition. The Art Of Enargeia », Routledge, 2020

This book employs a new approach to the art of sixteenth-century Europe by incorporating rhetoric and theory to enable a reinterpretation of elements of Mannerism as being grounded in sixteenth-century spirituality. Lynette M. F. Bosch examines the conceptual vocabulary found in sixteenth-century treatises on art from Giorgio Vasari to Federico Zuccari, which analyses how language and spirituality complement the visual styles of Mannerism. By exploring the way in which writers from Leone Ebreo to Gabriele...

Appel à communication : «“Retours à l’Apocalypse”. Héritage et hypertextualité dans les Mondes romans du Moyen Âge à nos jours », Université de Lille, date limite le 30 avril 2020

Colloque international Université de Lille, Avril-Mai 2021   Depuis la prise de conscience de la capacité de l’homme à causer sa propre fin, face à l’équilibre de la terreur établi par la guerre froide, jusqu’à l’essor actuel de la collapsologie et sa diffusion auprès du grand public, la notion d’apocalypse est devenue récurrente dans de nombreux discours et se trouve appliquée à de multiples domaines : apocalypse nucléaire, apocalypse écologique, apocalypse économique ou apocalypse politique, le...

Colloque : « Église(s) et vies des Grands Hommes. Les renouvellements de la biographie religieuse entre Renaissance et réformes (Italie/Europe, 1300-1700)», Ecole française de Rome, 12-13 mars 2020

La représentation en série des « grands hommes» devient, dans l’Europe de la fin du Moyen Âge et de la première modernité un instrument d’exaltation d’individus contemporains, une modalité d’écriture de l’histoire du temps présent et de mise en scène de la gloire et du triomphe des institutions. Loin de se cantonner aux portraits des princes et des rois, des hommes de guerre ou des lettrés et artistes laïcs, le motif des hommes illustres pénètre...

Appel à communication : « ‘Remarkable women’: Female patronage of religious institutions, 1350-1550 », Londres, The Courtauld Institute of Art, date limite le 10 avril 2020

This conference seeks to explore the ways in which women patronised and interacted with monasteries and religious houses during the late Middle Ages, how they commissioned devotional and commemorative art for monastic settings, and the ways in which these donations were received and understood by their intended audiences. The artistic donations of lay patrons to religious institutions has become a fruitful area of study in recent years, but the specific role played by women in...

Parution : C. R. Puglisi, W. Barcham, « Art and Faith in the Venetian World. Venerating Christ as the Man of Sorrows », Brepols, 2019

A study of Christ as Man of Sorrows in the Venetian world from the late Medieval through the Baroque era. Art and Faith in Venice is the first study of the Man of Sorrows in the art and culture of Venice and her dominions across three centuries. A subject imbued with deep spiritual and metaphorical significance, the image pervaded late-Medieval Europe but assumed in the Venetian world an unusually rich and long life. The book...

Parution : P. Bokody, A. Nagel (eds.), « Renaissance Meta-Painting », Brepols, 2019.

The volume offers an overview of meta-pictorial tendencies in book illumination, mural and panel painting during the Italian and Northern Renaissance. It examines visual forms of self-awareness in the changing context of Latin Christianity and claims the central role of the Renaissance in the establishment of the modern condition of art. Meta-painting refers to the ways in which artworks playfully reveal or critically expose their own fictiveness, and is considered a constitutive aspect of Western...

Parution : A. L. Williams, « Satire, Veneration, and St. Joseph in Art, c. 1300-1550 », Amsterdam university press, 2019.

Satire, Veneration, and St. Joseph in Art, c. 1300.1550 is the first book to reclaim satire as a central component of Catholic altarpieces, devotional art, and veneration, moving beyond humor’s relegation to the medieval margins or to the profane arts alone. The book challenges humor’s perception as a mere teaching tool for the laity and the antithesis of ‘high’ veneration and theology, a divide perpetuated by Counter-Reformation thought and the inheritance of Mikhail Bakhtin (Rabelais...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search