Étiqueté : art et science

Appel à communication : « The Art and Science of the Moon » Royal Museums Greenwich – Date limite 15 Mai 2019

Appel à communication : “The Art and Science of the Moon”(14-15 Novembre 2019, Royal Museums Greenwich, Londres)Date Limite: 15 MAI 2019 To mark the fiftieth anniversary of humanity’s first footsteps on another world, Royal Museums Greenwich (RMG) will host a major exhibition exploring our evolving relationship with the Moon across times and cultures. ‘The Moon’ (19 July 2019 – 5 January 2020) will present a scientific and cultural history of our nearest celestial neighbour, exploring...

Parution: Elisabeth Berry Drago, “Painted Alchemists – Early Modern Artistry and Experiment in the Work of Thomas Wijck”, publication 08 – 04 – 2019

Parution: “Painted Alchemists – Early Modern Artistry and Experiment in the Work of Thomas Wijck”,  écrit par Elisabeth Berry Drago, publié par Amsterdam University Press, date de publication 08 – 04 – 2019 Présentation: Thomas Wijck’s painted alchemical laboratories were celebrated in his day as “artful” and “ingenious.” They fell into obscurity along with their subject, as alchemy came to be viewed as an occult art or a fool’s errand. But these unusual pictures challenge...

Colloque : “Ingenuity in Early Modern Art and Science”, Cambridge, Université de Cambridge, le 11 et 12 avril 2019

Ingenuity in Early Modern Art and Science University of Cambridge, WYNG Gardens, Trinity Hall, Thompsons Lane, Cambridge, CB5 8AQ, April 11 – 12, 2019 This two-day conference, exploring ingenuity in early modern art and science, is the concluding conference for the five-year ERC-funded project Genius Before Romanticism: Ingenuity in Early Modern Art and Science, based at CRASSH (Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities).

Appel à communication : « Fiat Lux : Art, Religion, Science in Early Modern Italy », Toronto, date limite le 1er août 2018

Appel à communication : « Fiat Lux : Art, Religion, Science in Early Modern Italy » (RSA 2019, Toronto, 17-19 mars 2019) Light is essential to the visual arts and, indeed, to vision itself. Over seventy years ago, Millard Meiss drew our attention to the ethereal, often overlooked representation of light in some fifteenth-century paintings, eventually arguing that it “could become a major pictorial theme.” As we now know, Renaissance artists engaged with notions of...

Colloque international : « Material world : The Intersection of Art, Science, and Nature, in Ancient Literature and its Renaissance Reception », NIKI, Florence, 20-21 avril 2018

On 20-21 April the NIKI (Nederlands Interuniversitair Kunsthistorisch Instituut) hosts an international conference organized by our scholar-in-residence Guy Hedreen (Amos Lawrence Professor of Art, Williams College) and Michael W. Kwakkelstein : « Material world: The intersection of art, science, and nature, in ancient literature and its Renaissance reception ».  The interplay between art, science, and nature in several influential ancient texts, in antiquity as well as in the early modern period, is surprisingly different from our own late modern expectations. The most...

Colloque : « Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature », Los Angeles, UCLA Royce Hall Room 314, 4-5 mai 2018

CMRS Medical Humanities Conference Humanity has always tended to show a prurient interest in abnormalities. The medieval and early modern period is no exception, displaying a deep fascination with virulent ailments and all sorts of physical deformities. Despite this attraction, few artists of the period engaged in the depiction of disease. When they did, their expression was particular to the medium used and differed among artists even when using the same medium. Since such an...

Séminaire collectif d’histoire de l’art de la Renaissance : Joana Barreto & Claire Bosc-Tessié, « Le Maghreb et la Corne de l’Afrique en dialogue avec la Renaissance européenne: transfert de signes politiques, fabrique du sacré », Paris, INHA, salle Vasari, lundi 15 janvier, 18.00

Le séminaire collectif d’histoire de l’art de la Renaissance est organisé par le Centre d’Etudes Supérieures de la Renaissance (Université de Tours), le Centre d’Histoire et de Théorie des Arts (EHESS), l’Ecole Pratique des hautes Etudes et le Centre d’Histoire de l’Art de la Renaissance(Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne).   Programme 2017-2018   La troisième séance de l’année portera sur le Maghreb et la Corne de l’Afrique en dialogue avec la Renaissance européenne : transfert de signes politiques, fabrique du sacré et sera l’occasion...

Séminaire collectif d’histoire de l’art de la Renaissance: Susanna Longo et Elinor Myara Kelif, “Mythes, récits et images des origines de l’humanité”, Paris, INHA, salle Vasari, lundi 18 décembre, 18.00

Le séminaire collectif d’histoire de l’art de la Renaissance est organisé par le Centre d’Etudes Supérieures de la Renaissance (Université de Tours), le Centre d’Histoire et de Théorie des Arts (EHESS), l’Ecole Pratique des hautes Etudes et le Centre d’Histoire de l’Art de la Renaissance(Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne). Programme 2017-2018   La deuxième séance de l’année portera sur les Mythes, récits et images des origines de l’humanité et sera l’occasion d’une rencontre avec Susanna Longo (maître de conférences à l’Université Lyon III) et...

Colloque : « Art et Science, regards croisés », Liège, Université, Salle académique et salle des professeurs, 25, 26 et 27 octobre 2017

La question des relations entre art et science gagne aujourd’hui l’intérêt de nombreux chercheurs qui, à l’appui de cas exemplaires, démontrent avec toujours plus de pertinence le rôle joué par les avancées scientifiques et technologiques dans le domaine des arts, depuis la Renaissance jusqu’à nos jours. L’objectif du colloque “Art et science, regards croisés” est de comprendre les raisons d’une telle fascination des artistes pour la science, mais pas seulement. En croisant les regards –...

Conférence : ““Divine proportion” in Renaissance Venice: Bellini, Carpaccio and Luca Pacioli”, The Warburg Institute, 26 Oct 2017, 17.30-19.30

Speaker: Professor Paul Hills, Professor Emeritus, The Courtauld Institute of Art Venetian painting around 1500 is marked by a distinctive geometry. In this lecture I explore the synergy between the artistic and Euclidian culture of the Venetian Republic, broadly from the arrival of Giorgio Valla in 1481 through to the publication of Luca Pacioli’s Divina proportione in 1509.  Examining a number of works by Bellini and Carpaccio, I suggest how the emphasis on geometry and...