Étiqueté : femme

Parution : J. Vanessa Lyon, « Figuring Faith and Female Power in the Art of Rubens », Amsterdam, Amsterdam University Press, 2020

Figuring Faith and Female Power in the Art of Rubens argues that the Baroque painter, propagandist, and diplomat, Peter Paul Rubens, was not only aware of rapidly shifting religious and cultural attitudes toward women, but actively engaged in shaping them. Today, Rubens’s paintings continue to be used — and abused — to prescribe and proscribe certain forms of femininity. Repositioning some of the artist’s best-known works within seventeenth-century Catholic theology and female court culture, this book...

Appel à communications : « Femmes-oiseaux et encagements genrés. Genre, sexualité et désir autour des cages et des volières », Lyon, date limite le 5 juillet 2021

Cette journée d’études, organisée dans le cadre du programme de recherche « Nature(s) en cage(s) : une approche interdisciplinaire des volières » (PuNaCa – Putting nature in a cage: an interdisciplinary research program on aviaries), est consacrée au motif de l’encagement féminin. Elle vise à étudier, dans une perspective pluridisciplinaire, sur des plans aussi bien symboliques que matériels, pratiques, iconographiques ou linguistiques, les relations qui se sont tissées entre le goût pour l’ornithologie, les rapports...

Appel à publication : « Becoming a Witch. Women and Magic in Medieval Europe (ca. 500-1400) », date limite le 31 mars 2021

Becoming a Witch. Women and Magic in Medieval Europe (ca. 500-1400) Edited by Andrea Maraschi (University of Bari) In the fifteenth century, through the treatises by Jean Gerson, Johannes Nider, Alphonso de Spina, Heinrich Kramer and others, a new conceptualization of women’s involvement in magic took shape, which led to crafting an idea of the “witch”. The aim of this volume is to publish original research exploring the slow and complex path leading to such...

Appel à contribution : Women as Readers in Early Modern Italy, date limite le 15 mars 2021

Women as Readers in Early Modern Italy edited by Julia L. Hairston and Milena Sabato We are seeking abstracts for a collection of essays on women as readers in early modern Italy. Possible topics include but are not limited to: women’s literacy and education admonitions regarding what women read and/or write types of reading—oral, silent, public, private, etc. the various sources for the study of reading (archival documents, life-writing, portraits, treatises, etc.) how and where one...

Conférence en ligne : Women and the circulation of texts in the Renaissance, Londres, The Warburg Institute, le 25 février 2021 à 13h00

Brian Richardson (University of Leeds): Presentation of the book Women and the circulation of texts in the Renaissance (2020) The Book and Print Initiative was founded in 2017 to bring together scholars of books, printed material, and printing, at all career stages, across the School of Advanced Study (SAS). It is an umbrella for new and existing projects. As part of the UK’s research centre for the humanities, it provides a national focal point for the interdisciplinary,...

Appel à contribution : « Figures of Widows », Paris, INHA, 15 juin 2021, date limite le 15 mars 2021

Woman and widow under the Ancien Régime? The images defining a woman abound, should they describe a seductive woman, an influential or a common one. However, the images that could characterize the widow remain vague. As a matter of fact, the widow is defined essentially in negative terms; a widow is ‘the one who has lost her husband’ [1]. The social status imposed by widowhood is considered less favorable than that of a married woman,...

Appel à communication : Women and Agency: Transnational Perspectives, c.1450–1790, Virtual Symposium, University of Oxford, 24–25 June 2021, date limite le 28 février 2021

This two-day interdisciplinary symposium invites scholars to examine early modern women’s agency from a transnational perspective. Conversations about women’s agency continue to ripple across the world, from new, passionate campaigns in Mexico and Poland that have fought to address feminicide and sexual violence, to the Women’s Marches, which have annually inspired global response. Now, we turn with fresh urgency to early modern women’s participation in intellectual and literary cultures that bridged regional, national, and transnational...

Appel à communication : « The Virgin as Auctoritas : The Authority of the Virgin Mary and female moral–doctrinal authority in the Middle Ages », Association for Art History Annual Conference, Birmingham, date limite le 19 octobre 2020

Annual Association for Art History Conference, Birmingham 14 – 17 April 2021 Deadline 19 October 2020 This session aims at exploring a fundamental issue: female authority through the lens of visual/material culture. It involves prominently the Virgin Mary – as well as figures of female authority in the medieval world – because in the late decades of the 20th century, feminist thinkers pointed at the ‘negative model’ offered by the Virgin Mary since for centuries...

Appel à contribution : « Femme et folie sous l’Ancien Régime », Paris, 26-27 mars 2021, date limite le 1er septembre 2020

Dans son Histoire de la folie à l’âge classique (1961) Michel Foucault ne fait nulle part mention d’une différence entre les sexes, tant dans la classification que dans le traitement de la folie. Faut-il en conclure que le lien privilégié construit par la culture occidentale entre femme et folie ne prendrait son véritable essor qu’au XIXe siècle, le célèbre tableau Une leçon clinique à la Salpétrière (1887) jouant le rôle d’image archétypale ? C’est peu probable....

Appel à contribution : « Early Modern Women and Epidemics », Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal, n° 16.1 (Fall 2021), date limite 1er septembre 2020

Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal Volume 16.1 (Fall 2021) will feature a forum on “Early Modern Women and Epidemics” As Covid-19 has swept the world, early modern scholars have become acutely aware of the ways that its manifestations and the public’s reactions to them have resonated with outbreaks of disease in the premodern world. Social boundaries change and class mobility is brought into sharp focus—who can stay home; who must work, who can escape “hot...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search