Étiqueté : mort

Journées d’étude : « Death and Dying », Newbury, 15-18 août 2022

The Harlaxton Symposium is an interdisciplinary gathering of academics, students and enthusiasts which meets annually to celebrate medieval history, art, literature and architecture through a programme of papers selected around a chosen theme. This year’s symposium will be convened by Dr Christian Steer and Dr Jenny Stratford. Speakers will focus on death in the later Middle Ages in both its practical and devotional aspects. Among themes to be explored are the ways in which death...

Parution : Jessica Barker, « Stone Fidelity. Marriage and Emotion in Medieval Tomb Sculpture », Suffolk, Boydell & Brewer, 2022

Medieval tombs often depict husband and wife lying side-by-side, and hand in hand, immortalised in elegantly carved stone: what Philip Larkin’s poem An Arundel Tomb later described as their “stone fidelity”. This first full account of the “double tomb” places its rich tradition into dialogue with powerful discourses of gender, marriage, politics and emotion during the Middle Ages. As well as offering new interpretations of some of the most famous medieval tombs, such as those...

Appel à contribution : « XXe congrès de Danses macabres d’Europe », Brest, Association Danses macabres d’Europe/Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 20-23 septembre 2023, date limite le 01 septembre 2022

L’association Danses macabres d’Europe (DME) organise son XXe congrès en collaboration avec le Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique (CRBC) de l’université de Bretagne Occidentale (UBO). Il aura lieu du 20 au 23 septembre 2023 à Brest. Les congrès de DME regroupent des études sur la représentation de la mort dans l’art, la littérature et la société. Le prochain congrès de Danses macabres d’Europe aura lieu à Brest dans les locaux de l’Université de Bretagne...

Conférence : Stephen G. Perkinson, « Memento mori. Imagery and the Limits of the Self in Late Medieval Europe », Londres, The Courtauld Institute et en ligne, 26 mai 2022, 17h30

Objects bearing memento mori themes were abundant in Europe in the decades immediately around the year 1500. The material properties of these objects – the matter from which they were formed, the apparent care or negligence with which they were fashioned, and the ways their physical condition betrays signs of heavy use or careful conservation – can point us toward a better understanding of the diversity of interests that inspired their creation and use. These motivations range...

Appel à publication : « Art and Death in the Netherlands », Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art, vol 72, 2021, date limite le 15 avril

In premodern times, death was a more visible phenomenon than now, due to high mortality rates, but also to the fact that dying and death and the subsequent phases of deposition, bereavement and remembrance – more so than today – were collectively experienced, publicly performed, and commemorated in enduring monuments. Remembrance was held to extend into perpetuity, on personal grounds of love and affection, and for political and religious reasons, the latter normatively being related...

Parution : Stephen Perkinson et Noa Turel (dir.), Picturing Death 1200–1600, Leyde, Brill, 2020

Picturing Death: 1200–1600 explores the visual culture of mortality over the course of four centuries that witnessed a remarkable flourishing of imagery focused on the themes of death, dying, and the afterlife. In doing so, this volume sheds light on issues that unite two periods—the Middle Ages and the Renaissance—that are often understood as diametrically opposed. The studies collected here cover a broad visual terrain, from tomb sculpture to painted altarpieces, from manuscripts to printed books,...

Appel à contribution : « Gendering and Degendering Death in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Period », Dublin, avril 2021, date limite le 1er août 2020

Gender and Death in the Late Middle Ages and Early Modernity Submissions welcome for panel at the April 2021 Renaissance Society of America conference in Dublin Call for proposals on how the category of gender survived, disappeared or was transformed in contact with death in the late medieval and early modern period. Proposal of how the differentiation based on the categories male/female was maintained, effaced or subsumed within other contemporary categories when dealing with dead...

Colloque international : « Présence et imaginaire de la mort à la Renaissance », Château de Bournazel, 28 septembre 2019

Présence et imaginaire de la mort à la Renaissance “Les rencontres de Bournazel” Colloque international organisé par l’Institut de Recherche sur la Renaissance, l’âge Classique et les Lumières IRCL – UMR CNRS 5186Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier 3 PROGRAMME : Samedi 28 septembre matin 09h30 Thierry Verdier, Professeur d’histoire de l’art moderne, Université Paul-Valéry, Montpellier 3, ouverture des 8e Rencontres de Bournazel 2019 : Présence et imaginaire de la mort à la Renaissance Présidence : François Roudaut,...

Exposition : “Le livre & la mort (XIVe – XVIIIe siècle)”, Paris, Bibliothèque Mazarine et bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, du 21 mars au 21 juin 2019

Étroits sont les liens qui unissent la mort et l’écrit. L’épigraphie, le manuscrit puis l’imprimé ont été mobilisés pour préserver le souvenir des disparus, et le rapport d’intimité qui lie le livre au lecteur a fait du premier le miroir privilégié des interrogations du second sur sa propre finitude. La Mort elle-même, comme figure et comme sujet, fait son entrée en littérature au 14e siècle, suscitant une appréhension moins abstraite du trépas. On dit et...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search