Étiqueté : Venise

Conférence en ligne : ‘A Society on Show: State Processions in Renaissance Venice (1495-1600)’, Londres, The Warburg Institute, le 24 février 2021 à 17h30

Matteo Casini (University of Massachusetts, Boston), A Society on Show: State Processions in Renaissance Venice (1495-1600) From the well-known Palm Sunday Procession in 1495 to the early 17th century, the main State processions in Venice were extraordinary feasts in which intense acts of religious devotion were intertwined with civic splendor and symbolism. Long corteges developed with hundreds of participants, particularly in St. Mark’s Square, and their exhibition lasted hours. The church and confraternities appeared with...

Parution : Ella Beaucamp et Philippe Cordez, Typical Venice? The Art of Commodities, 13th-16th centuries, Turnhout, Brepols, 2021

What is the art of commodities, and how does it contribute to shaping a city? The case of Venice, which perhaps more than any other late medieval or early modern city depended on trade, offers some widely applicable considerations in response to these questions. Commodities exist as such only when they can be bought and sold. Select materials, techniques and tools, motifs, and working processes are entailed in the conception and realization of commodities, with...

Appel à communication : « Renaissance Bergamo: At the Edge of the Venetian Terraferma », RSA 2021, Dublin, date limite le 5 août 2020

Session du Congrès de la Renaissance Society of America – Dublin, 2021 Present day Bergamo is bifurcated into an  upper and lower portion of the city by the Venetian walls, built in 1561-1623 to discourage Milanese northward expansion, as well as to limit contraband trade. Bergamo was one of the most important of the strong points fortified by the Venetian state in the sixteenth century, through its position at the end of the chain in acting...

Appel à communication : « A Fresh Look at Fresco in Venice », Dublin, RSA 2021, date limite le 10 août 2020

Since the sixteenth century the place of Venetian painting within the history and theory of art has been inextricably linked with the use of oil paint on canvas. Yet the city was once renowned for its frescoes too. Noting that the palaces along the Grand Canal were all painted, the French envoy Philippe de Commynes, visiting in 1495, deemed it the “most beautiful street in the entire world.” Francisco de Hollanda (1548) described the entire...

Appel à contribution : « The Church of San Rocco: Confraternal Religious Space and Sanctuary », Venise, 2-4 décembre 2021, date limite le 21 juin 2020

The project Churches of Venice: New Research Perspectives (Chiese di Venezia: Nuove prospettive di ricerca)—begun in 2010 and from 2017 supported by the Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage at Ca’ Foscari University, Venice and currently sponsored by Save Venice Inc.—consists of a multi-year program of interdisciplinary conferences each focused on a specific Venetian church. The project is designed to engage different disciplines for a deeper understanding of the complex social and religious phenomena embodied...

Exposition : « Vittore Carpaccio. Dipinti e disegni », Venise, Palazzo Ducale, du 10 octobre 2020 au 24 janvier 2021

Celebre soprattutto per i suoi cicli di dipinti narrativi e religiosi, Vittore Carpaccio (1460/66 – 1525/26) rappresenta la grandezza e lo splendore di Venezia trasportando le storie sacre nella vita quotidiana, in scenari ricchi di dettagli, unendo l’osservazione della scena urbana al poetico e al fantastico. Oggetto di un rinato interesse della storiografia, anche grazie a recenti scoperte, attribuzioni e restauri, Carpaccio non è più stato oggetto di un’esposizione monografica dal 1963, dalla storica mostra...

Appel à communication : « Genders », Second Seminar of the Venetian Art History Group, University of Warwick, date limite le 31 mai 2020

The question of genders in Venetian art is of particular significance and perennial interest. The artistic culture of Venice may have given special emphasis to the ‘feminine’, whether this is understood in terms of the depiction of the body, or as more widely reflected in its concern with lavish surfaces and rich materials. The art of Venice could even be understood as offering a kind of ‘feminine’ alternative to the more male-orientated artistic cultures of Florence...

Séminaire : Juliane von Fircks, « Textile Merchants as Patrons of Art in Florence, Genoa, Bologna and Venice », Florence, Villa I Tatti, 19 mars 2020 à 18h30

Speaker:  Juliane von Fircks (I Tatti / University of Jena) Details to follow Juliane von Fircks is Professor in Medieval Art History at the Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena. She is the author of Liturgische Gewänder des Mittelalters in St. Nikolai zu Stralsund (2008); Skulptur im südlichen Ostseeraum. Stile und Werkstätten im 13. Jahrhundert (2012) and co-editor of Oriental Silks in Medieval Europe (2016). Her forthcoming book is entitled Panni tartarici – Luxusgewebe aus Asien im spätmittelalterlichen Europe. She contributed to the exhibition Textiles and Wealth in...

Parution : C. R. Puglisi, W. Barcham, « Art and Faith in the Venetian World. Venerating Christ as the Man of Sorrows », Brepols, 2019

A study of Christ as Man of Sorrows in the Venetian world from the late Medieval through the Baroque era. Art and Faith in Venice is the first study of the Man of Sorrows in the art and culture of Venice and her dominions across three centuries. A subject imbued with deep spiritual and metaphorical significance, the image pervaded late-Medieval Europe but assumed in the Venetian world an unusually rich and long life. The book...

Exposition : « La Serenissima : Drawing in Venice from the 16th to the 18th Century », Stuttgart – Staatsgalerie, du 11 octobre 2019 au 2 février 2020

In no other country is the diversity and individuality of regional styles as pronounced as it is in Italy, and nowhere else is this singularity of a regional style more striking than in Venice. The uniquely atmospheric light of the city reflected by the shimmering waters of the lagoon converges with the hazy, vaporous air to create a very special visual experience, which inspired Venetian painters and draughtsmen alike. ‘Sprezzatura’, nonchalance, became a leitmotif. The...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search